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The Inside Secret to Successful PdM (Read 15549 times)
bladesofazrael
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The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
08/30/07 at 19:50:20
 
If you want to transform your predictive maintenance program, it's
not about buying the latest gadget, software or computer system.
 
It's not about the latest fad, gimmick or scheme which will let you
push a button and improve your equipment reliability overnight ...
because that doesn't exist.
 
In truth, the surest way to transform your program is to change the
way you and your company THINK about predictive maintenance. In
other words, it's what's between your ears that counts.
 
You see, there's a direct link between the way people think and the
way people act.
 
Earl Nightingale, the great success writer, speaker, and
broadcaster called it the Strangest Secret to Success when he
stated, "We become what we think about."
 
In a nutshell, every action springs from the hidden seeds of
thoughts. Whether it's spontaneous or pre-meditated, all action is
rooted in thoughts.
 
For example, imagine you are driving down the road, with no traffic
in sight as you're listening to your favorite music. Suddenly, as
you come over the top of a hill, you see a police car on the side
of the road with a radar gun.
 
What's the first thing you do? Take your foot off the gas - right?
 
Even if you were not driving over the speed limit, just the THOUGHT
of getting pulled over causes you to slow down immediately.
 
That's a simple example of the "cause and effect" relationship
between the way you think and the way you act. Actions are
merely thoughts that have been completed.
 
 
****************************************
Mental Input Determines Physical Output
****************************************
 
All you have ever achieved and all that you will achieve is a
direct result of your thinking. That's the most powerful secret to
success which has stood the test of time.
 
What that means is, if most people in your company believe "fix it
when it breaks" is the best approach to maintenance, that's exactly
the kind of program you'll have.
 
On the other hand, if most people believe in planned, proactive,
condition-based maintenance, then that's the kind of program you'll
have.
 
If your company's thinking is inconsistent, the results will be
somewhere in-between.
 
The point is, you cannot consistently perform in a manner that is
inconsistent with your thinking.
 
So if your program isn't where you want it to be, you need to
adjust your thinking - instead of searching for all the answers
externally.
 
 
***************************
Why Einstein Got It Wrong
***************************
 
You've probably heard Albert Einstein's definition of insanity:
 
Doing the same things over and over and expecting different results.
 
But truly, insanity is THINKING the same things over and over and
expecting different results.
 
Because if you keep on thinking what you're thinking, you'll keep
on doing what you're doing. And if you keep doing what you're
doing, you'll keep getting what you've got.
 
So if you want different results, the first step is to change the
way you and your organization think. That's the straightest,
surest path to achievement. There can be no sustained progress or
achievement without it.
 
 
*************************************
The Impact of Training and Education
*************************************
 
There are two paths to success in predictive maintenance:
 
1. You can build it.
 
2. Or you can sit on it and wait for it to grow.
 
Make no mistake, the top predictive maintenance programs didn't
just happen by accident. Every one of them started with a small
group of people who believed there was a better way of doing
things. They were intellectually curious, so they went out and got
educated in best practices.
 
That's why the impact of training cannot be overstated. Because
the real opportunity for success lies within the person - not in
the job.
 
Let's face it, most locked doors are in people's minds. As a
result, people rarely commit to a program that is imposed on them.
But they willingly commit to a program they help create.
 
Study after study proves the value of training and education.
Every dollar invested in training is returned many times in
increased effectiveness.
 
Education infuses new ideas, concepts and thought patterns. It is
the seed that triggers the imagination, creates energy and sparks
the change.
 
Any maintenance organization can change their results by renewing
their minds, focusing on the right things and sticking with it long
enough to get results.
 
That's the first - and most important - step toward entering the
ranks of the highest achievers.
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #1 - 09/08/07 at 05:18:51
 
These days, it seems like everybody is talking about Lean. Lean
manufacturing, Lean organizations, Lean management, Lean this, Lean
that.
 
So that brings up one of the biggest questions maintenance and
reliability managers face:
 
"Where are we going to get the time, money and resources we need
for predictive maintenance?"
 
Simple question. Here's part of the answer.
 
One of the first places to look for "extra" resources is inside
your own maintenance program. Your PREVENTIVE maintenance
program, that is.
 
How's that?
 
Because most maintenance managers believe they are doing too
much PM and getting too few results.
 
So that's why we published this new special report:
 
"Are You Doing Too Much PM? 16 Ways to Save Time and Money on
Preventive Maintenance"
 
Here's a link that will take you right to this short, easy-to-read,
18-page report:
 
http://www.alliedreliability.com/admin/files2/files/PMReport.pdf
 
Now maybe you have already seen this report, I don't know. It's
been downloaded thousands of times since it was published a few
weeks ago.
 
But here's the thing. You see, while most people believe they ARE
too many PM's, deciding WHICH ones to eliminate is a different
story.
 
For starters, there are a number of factors to consider, including:
 
- Is this PM really necessary?
- Is it required for safety or regulatory purposes?
- Does it address a specific failure mode?
- Is there a better way to do it?
- Could it be replaced with a different type of inspection?
- Does it require a skilled craftsman to perform the task?
 
And that's just the beginning. So that's why we decided to develop
a custom PM evaluation software tool to help make the job quicker
and easier.
 
In a nutshell, this new software gives you the methodology you need
to analyze all the PM's in your system, identify the waste and
right-size your program.
 
With this easy-to-use software, you can determine:
 
-> Which PM's don't add value and can be eliminated immediately -
without any impact on equipment reliability
 
-> What PM's can be replaced with PdM technologies
 
-> Which PM's can be reassigned
 
-> Which PM's need to be rewritten to address specific failure
modes
 
-> How much savings - in both man-hours and dollars - you can free
up
 
The results can be eye-opening.
 
In fact, after evaluating hundreds of PM programs across multiple
industries, we've found that over HALF the PM's can be eliminated
or replaced with PdM.
 
Now let's break that down with a simple example.
 
Take a plant that's spending 10 million dollars a year on
maintenance.
 
Assume 50 percent of that - or $5 million - is spent on labor.
 
If just 20 percent of that labor is dedicated to PM's, that's $1
million.
 
So if half of that $1 million could be eliminated or replaced with
PdM, there's an extra 500,000 dollars that can be freed up for the
PdM program.
 
Depending on the labor rates, that's like adding 5 - 10 more
maintenance people - at no extra cost.
 
Now your mileage may vary, but that's not bad for a start.
 
So why am I telling you all this?
 
Because this powerful PM evaluation software is just one of the
tools you get with Allied's new PM/PdM Best Practices training
series.
 
As a matter of fact, it's introduced in the very first
session.
 
Along with the software, you get hands-on, step-by-step training on
how to use it. As a result, you can put it to work as soon as you
get back to the office, so you can:
 
1. Free up the time and money you need to accelerate your PdM
program
 
2. Improve your wrench time
 
3. Eliminate "pencil-whipping"
 
4. Improve inspection time vs. correction time
 
5. Clean up the wasteful work orders that regularly come out of
your CMMS
 
In truth, this one software tool can offset the total costs of the
PM-PdM Best Practices training classes - many times over!
 
Isn't it time you right-sized your PM program?
 
Now you can at:
 
http://www.lce.com/pmpdm.aspx
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #2 - 09/19/07 at 23:08:11
 
What is the biggest challenge you face in predictive maintenance?
 
That's the simple question we've asked thousands of maintenance and
reliability professionals.
 
Interestingly enough, the number one response we get is this:  
 
How to convince senior management why PdM is important.
 
That's the main issue we hear repeated again and again - from all
over the world. For example, here's how one maintenance manager
puts it:
 
"We had a very strong PdM program here for about 15 years. We were
very successful at preventing production losses by finding and
resolving equipment problems before the equipment failed.  
 
"Unfortunately, the company has gone through a series of management
changes and reorganizations to become 'more competitive'.
 
"New managers do not yet understand the importance of the 'new'
functions they have acquired, so the PdM effort is now struggling a
bit. Most managers are wondering why they even have to do any of
it since the equipment seems to be performing 'just fine'. Why are
we dedicating resources to this?"
 
Does this sound like your management's mind-set?
 
If so, I've got two great resources for you - including a new free
report you can download and give to your management.  
 
More on that in a minute, but first:
 
**********************************
How to Build Your Business Case
**********************************
 
Simply put, if you want to convince your management that PdM is a
good investment, you have to speak their language.
 
What language? Money - of course. Ultimately, all senior managers
speak the universal language of money.
 
You can forget about most of the technical components and
engineering details. That's when their eyes roll back in their
heads, and they get that "deer in the headlights" look.
 
However, if you can show them the impact that PdM has on your
plant's bottom-line profits, that's a totally different story.
 
So that's why we have included a 20-page "Business Case Workbook"
in the new PM-PdM Best Practice training series. In a nutshell,
this is a case study and step-by-step exercise designed to show
attendees:
 
- How to make your reliability initiative "self-funding"
 
- How to eliminate non-value-added work and leverage "wrench time"
 
- How to form the right organizational structure and get the
staffing you need - without adding headcount
 
- Why cost avoidance should never be used to justify PdM
 
- Where to find the benchmark data you need to model successful
programs
 
- How to prove the value of predictive maintenance and improved
reliability
 
It's an excellent way to get ... and keep ... the support you need
from your management.
 
The next class starts October 30th, and it's sure to be a
sell-out. You can avoid disappointment by enrolling now at:
 
http://www.lce.com/pmpdm.aspx
 
Now for the free report I was telling you about ...
 
The truth is, there is a big disconnect between maintenance and
senior management.
 
In spite of the huge impact of maintenance and reliability on the
bottom line, you won't find it taught in many schools. Zero
business schools, in fact.
 
So most senior managers really don't know what's going on in
maintenance. What's worse, they don't even know the right
questions to ask.
 
What they do know is that maintenance is usually the single largest
controllable expense in a plant. So they see maintenance as an
easy way to cut budgets and save money.  
 
Well, that's why we published this new special report:
 
"What Every Senior Manager Must Know About Maintenance and
Reliability - 10 Powerful Lessons from One of the Most Shocking
Maintenance Mistakes in Recent History"
 
This is a real eye-opening look at oil giant BP's recent problems
with maintenance and reliability in Alaska - and the staggering
financial impact. It's a quick read --- and a wake-up call for
your management.
 
Here's a link that will take you right to it:
 
http://www.alliedreliability.com/admin/files2/files/mgrs_report.pdf
 
The whole purpose of the report is to change management's thinking
about maintenance and reliability. How? By exposing the huge
impact it has on revenues, costs, profits and share price.
 
So I highly recommend that you download it, print it and read it
... and then pass it on to your management.  
 
 
 Grin Tongue
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #3 - 09/21/07 at 18:25:36
 
In this issue, I'd like to share with you a simple formula used by
almost everyone who achieves real breakthroughs and long-lasting
success.
 
Quite frankly, it's not a new concept. In fact, it dates all the
way back to the ancient Greeks.
 
Here's the secret: World-class achievers never waste their time
re-inventing the wheel. While they may appear to be innovators, in
fact, they are serious students of previous successes.
 
So the best piece of advice for anyone tackling a new project is
this:
 
1. Find someone who is already doing what you want to do or has the
results you want to achieve.
 
2. Learn what they did to achieve their results.
 
3. Follow the steps they took and methods they used.
 
This is the shortest, surest path to success.
 
It's easy to find successful examples of this principle. For
example:
 
- Plato studied under Socrates.
 
- Rembrandt copied Leonardo da Vinci.
 
- The Beatles copied Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry and Little Richard.
 
- Tiger Woods modeled his career after Jack Nicklaus.
 
- Bill Gates chose Warren Buffet as a mentor.
 
I could go on and on, but I think you get the point. Having great
mentors can have a huge impact on your career. The trick is to
always copy from the very best.
 
Why do beginners constantly want to re-invent the wheel? Good
question. Maybe it goes back to their school days, when copying
from someone else was against the rules.
 
But if you want the highest chances of success AND the shortest
path, find someone you can model. Study their methods. Learn from
their mistakes. Look for the things they did that you can copy.
 
The creativity comes from applying a new angle or new twist to an
old idea.
 
So what does all this have to do with maintenance?
 
Simply this: The fastest, surest route to successful reliability
is to model best practices in Preventive and Predictive
maintenance.
 
There's no point wasting time and money on trial and error. Just
find someone who has successful processes and model them.
 
Basically, that's what the PM-PdM Best Practices training series is
all about.
 
It's all the information you need in one total package: 12 days of
training, 4 sessions, 3 days each. Plus the software tools you
need to put new-found knowledge into practice.
 
Why learn the hard way when you can bypass all the big mistakes?
Learn from people who are living examples of what they teach.
 
In my personal experience, while I was in school, I was a co-op
with Noranda Aluminum, which is a big aluminum producer. The very
first day, they asked me if I knew what vibration analysis was, and
I said I had no idea. Well, they had a vendor coming in, and I was
assigned to him. He and I hit it off and became friends. He
helped me and taught me a lot.
 
Most recently, I managed a highly successful PdM program with 27
PdM technicians and analysts. Now, I am the Director of Allied
Reliability's Training program. I am a life-long learner and my
passion for teaching and for sharing a proven body of knowledge with
others. That is the driving force for the PM/PdM Best Practices
Workshop Series.
 
So, if you want help from people who will support your passion for
maintenance and reliability ...
 
If you want to learn from other people's mistakes ...
 
If you want to be encouraged rather than discouraged ...
 
If you want your dream to become a reality ...
 
Enroll now at http://www.lce.com/pmpdm.aspx
 
You see, the world is full of people who can tell you what you
should do. But there are precious few who have done it ... and are
willing to help you do it too.
 
That's what this class and these tools are for:
 
http://www.lce.com/pmpdm.aspx
 
As Mark Twain said, "Keep away from people who try to belittle your
ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make
you feel that you, too, can become great."
 
That's it for part 4. Next time:
 
Three types of PdM programs - which group are you in?
 
 
 Grin Tongue Cheesy
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #4 - 09/27/07 at 22:43:22
 
**********************************************
3 Types of Programs - Which Group Are You In?
**********************************************
 
According to a recent study by the Aberdeen Group, there are three
types of maintenance programs:
 
1. Best-in-class (top 20% of performers)
 
These companies use standardized, enterprise-wide proactive
maintenance processes like predictive, reliability centered
maintenance, total productive maintenance and root cause analysis.
 
2. Average performers (middle 50%)
 
There's little to no use of proactive maintenance processes in this
group. Routine preventive maintenance is the most widely-used
approach.
 
3. Laggards (bottom 30%)
 
Reactive break/fix work is the primary approach with little to no
preventive or other proactive maintenance.
 
And the result?
 
Best in class companies average 88.8% in uptime and availability.
Laggards average 81.8%.
 
What's more, best-in-class companies do maintenance cheaper; their
equipment maintenance and service costs average 17% of revenues
compared to the laggards at 23.5%.
 
So let's look at financial difference between best-in-class and
laggards at a plant which produces $100 million per year in product:
 
$7 million more in revenues
$6.3 million less cost
 
That's a $13.3 million dollar swing in gross profits.
 
And that's just one of the revelations from this eye-opening
21-page study.
 
You can get the full report here:
 
www.alliedreliability.com/admin/files2/files/proact.pdf
 
I think you'll find it interesting. It's one of the best reports
I've seen on how proactive maintenance impacts financial
performance.
 
Once again, here's that link:
 
www.alliedreliability.com/admin/files2/files/proact.pdf
 
 
 Grin Cheesy Wink Smiley
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #5 - 10/07/07 at 22:56:00
 
This time I'd like to take you behind the scenes with a rare look
inside a highly-successful PdM program.
 
You see, when I had the chance to interview our very own Clyde
Hughes on PdM, I jumped on it! Because Clyde is one of our most  
experienced Oil Analysts and is a Subject Matter Expert on  
Lubrication as well as Predictive Maintenance.  
 
So we grilled Clyde with some of the toughest, most frequently
asked questions we hear every day from corporate maintenance
managers and reliability engineers.
 
Read on as Clyde gives down-to-earth, honest answers to each
question in this exclusive interview.  
 
If you prefer to read this interview as a web page, just hop over
to:
 
http://www.alliedreliability.com/index.cfm?id=105
 
************************************************************
 
Q: Clyde, how did you get started in predictive maintenance?
 
A: I stumbled into lubrication as a specialty a little over five
years ago. I had done some of that before; I was an industrial
mechanic in the Navy. I worked on gas turbines engines and engine
room stuff. We had lubrication programs and fuel quality management
programs there, and that's what got me started.  
 
Q: What do you enjoy most about your job?
 
A: I enjoy the challenge of figuring out how to overcome the
problems with lubrication that we have in this facility and other
facilities I have worked in, finding a problem and crafting a
solution for it.  
 
Q: What's the number one thing your customer wants from you?
 
A: To not have to worry about their equipment. We give them a
comprehensive package to improve reliability and reduce unplanned
breakdowns. It gives them a lot of peace of mind and comfort
knowing that people who care about it, and are knowledgeable, are
doing things to improve reliability overall.  
 
Q: What are the results?
 
Very good. I can only think of one failure we've had in the past
year that I probably should have called earlier. I should have
noticed it needed a better look at with vibration, because of the
amount of wear metal I saw.  
 
Some units generate wear all the time. We monitor them closely,
instead of just replacing it, and wait for vibration or some other
technology to indicate that it's actually time to move on it.  
 
Q: How long does it take to build a lubrication program that
produces results like that?
 
A: I was here 6 months before we got our retrofit design hammered
out, and got started retrofitting the equipment, so we could do
filtering and oil changes more efficiently. It was a year after
that before we started to see results in our remediation efforts.
It can take up to four years to reach your goals. You have got to
have patience. And just keep working at it. Do a little bit every
day. Pretty soon it adds up to a lot.  
 
Q: What's the best piece of advice you would give to someone who is
about to establish a new lubrication program?
 
A: Take some time to research what's available. Don't just rush
into it. Most problems have a simple solution, which is often
better than a complex solution. Fundamentals are always important.  
 
In lubrication, the goal is to keep your lubricant clean and dry and
fit for use. We don't need to over-engineer our solutions. Try
and keep it simple. Start slow and build on success, instead of
trying to bite off the whole thing at once.  
 
It can be an overwhelming task, especially at a larger and older
facility. Bite off a little at a time. Build on your successes.
Don't be afraid to ask for help. Most of us out here are willing to
share our knowledge, because we can't be everywhere and solve all
the problems. A lot of times, we bounce ideas against each other.  
At Allied, we are really good at talking among ourselves and
soliciting advice from colleagues.  
 
Keep up with your literature. Don't forget your fundamentals.  
 
Q: What kind of changes do you see as a program develops and
matures?
 
A: It gets to be more of a management thing instead of 'come in and
change things.' Now I do less stuff in the field and a lot more in
the office. More of an administrator and less of a problem-solver.
But I have to keep focused on what's going ahead.
 
The challenges can be great. At some plants, you have the
challenge of overcoming an ingrained culture, in a place that's not
familiar with what you're trying to do. You have to gain the trust
and confidence of those you are working with, and those who you are
trying to bring around to improve the reliability mindset.  
 
Sometimes, especially in older establishments or plants, there is
the mindset "that won't work here." People don't like to hear that
they have done things wrong for years. It's not that they did it
knowingly; they just didn't have the knowledge at that point in
time.  
 
People are reluctant to change. They think, "It has worked for so
long it must be okay." We don't want to say that anybody has done
anything wrong, just that there might be a better way.  
 
Q: What do you see in the future for PdM?
 
A: I see a bright future for PdM, because as competitive pressures
increase, more and more industries are understanding the value that
it can bring to their program.
 
I think that there is going to be a need for multi-talented
individuals who understand more than one technology. It's not
going to be just vibration, or infrared, or lubrication. People
are going to have to have a working knowledge of all of them,
because there is consolidation in the industry. Everyone wants you
to do more with less. That's a challenge.  
 
===========================================
Clyde Huges contributed a great deal of his extensive PdM and Oil  
and Lubrication knowledge when Allied Reliability was in the  
development stages of the PM/PdM Best Practices Workshops. This is
valuable information and training everyone needs.  
 
To save $500 dollars on the next series of classes beginning October
30th, in Charleston, SC, go to:
 
http://www.alliedreliability.com/index.cfm?id=105
 
 Grin Tongue Cheesy Smiley
Back to top
 
 

Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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Re: The Inside Secret to Successful PdM
Reply #6 - 10/13/07 at 04:35:17
 
Recently we had the opportunity to talk with Brian Steinkruger, lead
analyst of one of our top PdM programs.  
 
In addition to day-to-day operations, Brian leads a team of 10 PdM  
professionals responsible for vibration analysis, oil analysis,  
infrared, online and off line motor testing.  
 
Here's what he had to say:
 
What do you enjoy most about your job?  
 
I think it's pretty exciting to be able to predict failures long  
before it will happen.  
 
Do you do that pretty well?
 
We catch in the upper 90%. We are right about 90% of the times we  
call a fault.  
 
If it's a bearing vault on a small gear box, I don't care which  
bearing it is, because we just replace the whole gear box. There  
are not a lot of times that we have to drill down to OK, it's this  
specific bearing on this specific shaft.  
 
But sometimes we do. We have a large gear box right now that's got  
an input shaft bearing, and we want to make sure that we're right on  
that, because we will probably replace the bearing right on the spot.  
 
What is the number one thing your customer wants from you?
 
Our customers don't want unexpected failures. And believe me, I'm  
the first person to hear it when something does fail and we don't  
catch it.  
 
How often does that happen?
 
That doesn't happen too often. I have a little problem with catching  
slow speed stuff. Once in a while we don't always catch a slow speed  
bearing. That's about the only instance I can think of that we haven't  
mastered.  
 
I'm not sure there is a silver bullet for that. I'm still looking  
for it if there is.  
 
How long does it take to develop a PdM program that produces results  
like that?
 
You're going to see results right from the get-go, but to get it up  
to a world class status I'd say you're looking at 5 years. When we  
started, we had vibration only, and then through the years we  
incorporated a lot of the other technologies.  
 
The biggest problem we had was that most of the reliability engineers  
and department heads had no idea what we were doing. And it didn't  
really come around until the customer sent them to school and training  
and let them know what PdM was all about. What we can catch and what  
we can't. So then they had a better understanding of it.  
 
It actually took that for it to really come around. That was the  
biggest problem I had - getting the department heads who were making  
the decisions to repair or not to repair things, getting them on the  
same page that we were.  
 
They didn't understand what we were doing, and they didn't believe  
us until we told them a few things like, "Hey, you need to change  
this or it's going to fail", and then it failed, before they would  
start listening to us.  
 
We would call a gear box, or a motor, or a bearing or something, and  
we would tell them, "Hey, you got this problem", and it would be there  
for another month, and we would tell them, "Hey, you need to change  
this real soon". And they still wouldn't believe us. Then it would  
fail within a short period of time.  
 
Then they started coming around saying, "Gee, maybe these guys do  
know what they are doing". And even then, it still took a while.  
 
So it took awhile for our client to train their people before it  
really came around.  
 
What is the biggest challenge that PdM professionals face today?
 
Getting other people to believe in the technology, because it does  
work. I've got the luxury right now that everyone does believe it.  
We tell them to do something, and they do it. Most of the time,  
we're right.  
 
I'm in a situation right now where it works very well. The company  
is behind it and they want to do it. As a matter of fact, the biggest  
question I get right now is, "How come you're not writing enough work  
orders?"  
 
Well, our maintenance people have gotten laser alignments, and we  
don't have the low hanging fruit anymore. We've taken care of the  
resonance issues, the balance problems, the alignment issues, and  
any of the problem childs we have solved.  
 
Now it's just the normal bearing that fails when its supposed to.  
 
How many work orders do you write per month?
 
We write about 40-50 work orders per month, while monitoring  
2200 machines. 75% of the work orders are generated from the oil  
lab - contaminated oil.  
 
 
 Grin Tongue Wink Smiley
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Michael Tyrone Alinell
Plant and Building Maintenance Engineer
Calamba City, Laguna
bladesofazrael@gmail.com
bladesofazrael@yahoo.com
bladesofazrael@lycos.com
mtbalinell@hotmail.com
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